Wednesday, June 4, 2008

£1.2M trial to test effectiveness of cognitive behavioral therapy

Study to map effectiveness of CBT for patients who have not responded to antidepressants

A team of researchers, led by Dr Nicola Wiles at the University of Bristol and involving researchers from the Peninsula Medical School in the South West, has been awarded £1.2 million by the National Institute for Health Research Health Technology Assessment (NIHR HTA) programme for a clinical trial to investigate the effectiveness of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) for patients with depression who do not respond to treatment with antidepressants.

Patients who have been taking antidepressants for at least six weeks will be invited to participate in the trial and receive either CBT in addition to their medication, or continue with usual care from their general practitioner (including medication). Both groups will be followed up for 12 months to see which approach is the most effective in reducing depressive symptoms and improving quality of life. Recruitment for the trial is due to start in the autumn.

The Bristol team, in partnership with researchers from the University of Exeter, the Peninsula Medical School, the University of Glasgow and the Avon and Wiltshire Mental Health Partnership, will also evaluate the cost-effectiveness of the treatment and patients' views and experiences of it.

Dr Nicola Wiles said: "CBT has been shown to help patients with depression but there is currently little evidence about what alternative treatment options doctors should discuss with patients who do not get better with antidepressants. Improving access to psychological therapies is a Government priority, so it is important that we conduct studies such as this to help inform the care of people with depression."


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